About Dan

Dan Rene possesses more than two decades of trusted communications experience in media relations and crisis communications. His background includes political campaign management, crisis communications, legislative advocacy, grassroots initiatives, and corporate communications.

As a strategic communications counselor and problem solver, Dan has protected the reputations of athletes, entertainers, politicians, academics and corporations facing the most challenging personal and professional issues.

Dan has also helped numerous individuals, associations, and corporations proactively define and promote their personal and organizational brands via diverse media, including television and radio appearances, as well as media receptions and news conferences. He has implemented several consumer media relations and corporate campaigns for products, services, and ideas – from start-ups to the world’s most trusted brands.

In 2006, Dan was responsible for coordinating the media outreach for the funeral of Civil Rights icon, Coretta Scott King. He has also crafted communications strategies for clients as diverse as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, The Chandra Levy Family, and the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis.

Dan is a veteran of public relations agencies, including Qorvis and Impact Strategies (now Smith & Company, the inspiration for the ABC Drama Scandal.) Dan also serves as a Communications Director for the National Legal and Policy Center, a nonprofit, nonpartisan foundation dedicated to promoting ethics and accountability in government.

Dan has served in leadership roles in dozens of political campaigns in the Commonwealth of Virginia and volunteers for many candidates and charitable causes. He serves on various boards and committees including the National Press Club. He is a native of Prince George County, Virginia and a graduate of Longwood College in Farmville, Virginia.

One last thing…Dan’s wife and children have exceptional athletic ability, something he lacks completely. After more than 50 races, and thousands of miles of practice, he remains the last one in his family to cross the finish line – proving that nice guys really do finish last.